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Author Topic: Olight i2 EOS Review  (Read 603 times)
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gearhounds
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« on: August 30, 2011, 05:22:20 PM »



As many of us know, ITP was a sister company to Olight. Recently, Olight seems to have consolidated it's products, and rather than relegating older models to the boneyard, they saw fit to breathe a little new life into them with some improvements. Included in the lights given a facelift was the A2 EOS, now the Olight i2 EOS. While the general lines remain, the improvements are obvious. 4Sevens has provided the new modes for evaluation as a light only; not sure what the retail packaging will look like, or include, but I suspect a battery, lanyard, and spare o-ring are a good guess. Dimensions of the light are as follows:

length- 81mm
width-  @17mm
weight- @20 grams

Size wise, the i2 is quite compact, seemingly dwarfed by the Fenix LD10 and the Romisen RC-G2.



The i2, like it's predecessor, is a twisty style EDC/key chain style light, incorporating 3 basic modes for general use, and breaks down into 2 parts. The i2 is powered by either a standard AA alkaline or rechargeable Ni-mh (or Ni-cd for those that still use them), and does not support lithium ion rechargeable batteries.



Finish on the light is is a light matte with just a touch of shininess; it is clean, free of visible defects, and evenly matched.The laser etched lettering is clean and well centered.



Starting at the head, the i2 has a very clear glass AR coated lens. The reflector is lightly textured, and is glossy, with no visible defects. The i2 utilizes Cree's XP-G emitter, a step up from the previous offering in the ITP A2, which came with an XP-E emitter.



Knurling on the i2 is identical to what was found on the previous A2, and the A1 EOS as well.



The driver board is set into the head of the light, and does not look to be easily removed.



Threading on the i2 is fine and trapazoidal. There is some play until the o-ring makes contact.



As is the case with the revamped A1 EOS, the i1 was given a face lift with a more solid clip design. Compared here to the A1 EOS, which is a snap on style clip.

 

The clip itself is firmly attached by way of two allen screws, and is removable. When clipped in a pocket, I found the i2 to be rock solid, with no hint of riding up.



As a twisty, the i2 has no mechanical switch, and relies on a large spring set into the tail end of the light for electrical conduction when activated. The spring has sufficient tension to keep the battery firmly in place.



Other improvements evident in the new i2 is giving it a flat base for tail standing. Also, the key chain/lanyard attachment point is now milled into the side of the base with a small split ring, rather than the previous design which used a small post on the bottom of the light. The base is laser embossed with the Olight website, and is plenty secure for standing on level surfaces.



The i2, like the i1, is a three mode twisty. The i2 is activated by twisting the head until tight, which starts out on low. A quick loose/tighten shifts up in modes. A pause of more than a second or so results in the circuit resetting to the default low mode. Mode changes are via PWM which, as seen in the new i1, is very subtle. Frequency is relatively high, as I can detect no flickering with the naked eye; the light must be waved rapidly before my face before I can detect it. From Olight, the modes and runtimes are as follows:

High: 75 lumens / 1.7 hours
Medium: 20 lumens / 5 hours
Low: 2.5 lumens / 60 hours

Time to insert a fresh AA battery and check current draw values. All testing was done with the shown Duracell Procell. The draw values are as follows:

Low: .05A
Medium: .32A
High: .93A

It is apparent from the "high" results that the i1 was not designed to win any output contests, rather to make the best use of a low voltage power source (available literally anywhere in the world I might add) and give longer runtimes instead.

BEAMSHOTS
All beamshots are labeled

INDOOR
To hearth

6' low


15' low


6' medium


15' medium


25' medium


6' high


15' high


25' high


Toy Room @20'

low


medium


high


OUTDOOR
Garage white wall

6' low


15' low


6' medium


15' medium


25' medium


6' high


15' high


25' high


To tree @20' high


To front of house @35' high


Conclusions

Olight's decision to revamp the earlier A2 was, in my opinion, a good one. The company was able, in this case, to keep the same original retail price, even with the addition of a more efficient emitter, and upgrades in fabrication. True, there are much brighter AA lights on the market, but this particular design seems more directed to usage as a key chain light/EDC that focuses on blend of useful output and runtime, as opposed to eye searing brightness. I had no difficulty navigating in pitch darkness on low, and found high to more than bright enough for any task a small, lightweight pocket light can be asked to do. The i2's simplicity of design and modes paired with the economical price makes it a good option, in my opinion.

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