Author Topic: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau  (Read 13806 times)

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Offline regentag

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Re: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau
« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2007, 05:16:41 AM »
It's never too late to start.  >:(
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Offline RPM

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Re: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau
« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2007, 06:19:46 AM »
Cutting Ti is much easier than tracking with this thread.... I'm so confused  ???

Offline regentag

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Re: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau
« Reply #32 on: November 29, 2007, 06:40:39 AM »
When in doubt, just keep on cutting!

We have people to take care of clutter.  ;)

Here is a refresher course:

The accompanying chart illustrates the progress of cutting tool technologies, beginning with the development of high-speed steel cutting tools in the early part of the last century, through the use of computer software to optimize cutting programs. Titanium machining, which began in aerospace in the 1940s, is graphed as having a modest-but-steady growth in removal rate per hour through the 1970s, then rapidly advancing from the late 1970s through 2000. However, since 2000, titanium cutting capacity has leveled out, restricted by advances in materials that have made titanium alloys nearly as hard as the tools that are used to cut them, and by slower advances in cutting tool technologies. This plateau in cutting technology is presenting a serious problem as Boeing Company and other aircraft manufacturers increase their use of these advanced titanium alloys, and require more titanium products to be machined.



(Courtesy of American Machinist)
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Offline knot

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Re: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau
« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2007, 08:47:20 AM »
It's never too late to start.  >:(

I'm allergic to alcohol. I get flushed, I itch, and get a headache and a rash.
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Offline knot

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Re: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau
« Reply #34 on: November 29, 2007, 09:04:15 AM »
As pointed out there are many grades of Ti. Each having a different modulus of elastisity. Spokes for a bike wheel would require much more elastic characteristics then say Grade 5 Ti (6%Al, 4%V) which would be used in high end bike frames. Generally even Ti bikes made with Grade 5 Ti main tubes will use a different alloy for the fork to provide a softer ride-or in the case of mountain bikes a dampened fork. I sure there are Ti spokes which can work well but the cross-section of the spokes is likely some type of oval shape. Actually, the beauty of the Scandium Alloys, and carbon fiber are the designer tweaks that can be added to create strenth in one plane allowing more elastic characteristics in one direction while providing rigidity in the others (remember there are six degrees of freedom thus flexibility in one and rigidity in five would make a great bike spoke)

The rim is a Mavic SUP with XTR hub and multicolored Ti spokes. The spokes were some $3 a piece back then. The wheel is really old now so I guess I shouldn't complain. Whenever they break, I replace them with stainless spokes.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2007, 09:11:17 AM by knot »
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Offline tonyd

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Re: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau
« Reply #35 on: November 29, 2007, 11:57:04 AM »
Always a good choice. Have used DT stainless spokes for years-never a problem ;)

EricMack

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Re: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau
« Reply #36 on: November 29, 2007, 01:07:30 PM »
Thank you, Gentlemen.  :thumbup:

Offline HarryN

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Re: Titanium Cutting Capacity At a Plateau
« Reply #37 on: December 19, 2007, 08:15:02 PM »
The nice thing about the plane guys all going to Ti, is that there is now more capacity for 7050 and 7075 Al alloys.  I have found my happiness for flashlights in these.  It is a heck of a lot more scratch resistant than the 6000 series alloys, less gummy, makes nice chips, easy for a beginner to machine, etc.  From MHO, it is "almost as good as steel" where you need it, with Al weight.

Other than my normal desire to instead have Scandium alloys instead, it is just the ticket.

Coming back to the point about machining Ti alloys and the challenges - this just brings back the original way that most Ti alloy parts were made - near net shape using HIPS (hot isostatic pressure ) - molding powders.  There are a lot of underused machine shops out there, maybe if Boeing really needs more capcity, they can hold some seminars to get more suppliers.